100 thoughts on “Fight or Flight Response

  1. Mr. Anderson, I watch your video, really nice and helpful, but please try to explain on everything your write, even though you have done in other videos, example, (ATP), you should say what it stands for and what it does, briefly…. Thanks

  2. We reviewed this today in my biopsychology class and I found this video that further expanded my understanding of the fight or flight response. Thanks! Science is badass

  3. To you, Would be possible to activate extra-sensory perception by using the adrenal glands? Since neuronal activity depends on electric impulses produced in the body by the nervous system, the idea of enhancing the production of electricity in the brain (through the adrenal glands) to increase our thinking capacity makes a lot of sense to me.

  4. When i woke up from surgery the nurses told me that i was fighting 3 of them but i don't remember so does this count as fight or flight?

  5. What goes on in the body during and just after a car accident? Had one a little while back (first and only) where I hit a fence, not anther car and I was dazed confused and in shock. Took me a few seconds after to realize what had happened but I had this very strong tingling numb feeling all over, and felt like I was in a dream

  6. Thanks for this; very pleasant.
    What has held my attention for years and decades: some fly (run and hide), some freeze ("deer in the headlights) while still others "take a knee" and come up with some plan of action. What determines the person's choice of tactic/strategy in the moment?

  7. Cool. So when I hear of someone getting a shot of adrenaline during surgery or if they've been injured, are they causing that with drugs?

  8. Is it possible that glucose intolerance can actually be caused by the anxiety as the fight or flight response when the adrenaline/epinephrine causes glucose release which will increase your blood sugar level without having to consume nutrients

  9. So how is the fight or flight response turned "off". We do not permanently exist in a state of arousal after the threat is gone, what is it that returns the body to its normal state?

  10. When you said that's the way "our body is designed," I agree.

    I was in one of these situations yesterday; almost having drowned. Without being cheesy and religious, the body is fearfully and wonderfully made. I have no doubt that biochemically, we're the product of a loving creator, not evolution.

  11. Epinephrine acts on alpha receptors causing vasoconstriction and on beta receptors causing vasodilation. The affinity of epinephrine for beta receptors is somewhat greater than its affinity for alpha receptors. When given in low doses, or by slow IV infusion in humans, the beta effects of epinephrine may predominate.''

    Let's talk about this for a moment. There are more alfa 1 adrenergic receptors in arterioles however epinephrine has greater affinity for beta 2 receptors in arterioles therefore when given in lower doses it will occupy only available beta 2 receptors and cause vasidilatation ,and there will be plenty alfa 1 receptors unoccupied, so if we administer highed dose of adrenaline right after, all adrenaline molecules will now occupy alfa 1 receptors since beta 2 receptors in blood vessel walls are all ocuppied from first administration which will result in vasoconstriction this time

  12. I once fell off the roof of a tall garage, but mid fall I maintained control and bounced of the wall and landed on my feet like a cat. Is this adrenaline?

  13. Stress may be characterized through anxiety or through fear, but Anxiety does NOT represent a flight/fight reaction, only fear does.

    Anxiety is a separate emotion from fear, or the flight or fight response. The flight/fight fleeing system (FFFS) is activated by situations that entail imminent threat. In the popular literature of stress, the FFFS is commonly invoked for autonomic arousal occurring across all threatening and non-threatening situations. However, for distant threats (e.g. a spider approaching from a great distance away as compared to a spider an inch from your nose), or for non-threatening choice/choice conflicts (e.g., distractive conflicts), the FFFS is not activated. Thus, covert neuro-muscular activity in these situations cannot be attributed to instinctive flight/fight neural mechanisms, but to cortical activity, therefore implicating learning processes.

    References:

    https://www.scribd.com/doc/284056765/The-Book-of-Rest-The-Odd-Psychology-of-Doing-Nothing

    Berkman, E. T., Leiberman, M.D., & Gable, S.L. (2009) BIS, BAS, and response conflict: Testing predictions of the revised reinforcement sensitivity theory. Personality and Individual Differences, 46(5-6), 586-591

  14. Phosphatidylserine, 200mg, 2 hours before bed. Will solve all your brain problems in one month..completely safe, natural (already in your brain) and non addictive. Get ready for the next level 👆🏻✌🏻

  15. I almost died from fight or flight (domestic violence) my heart could not take it no artery block,took me almost two years to re-coup M

  16. his eyes is how he got away major blessing we have. plus it around 2001 with no smart phone literally use my mobile while walking now a lot off 2017 smart tech addicts like me could've not survived

  17. yeah …adrenalin hormone produced from the top of kidneys …makes flight or fight …
    what if the anrenalin hormone is extranally given through syringes

  18. Most people don't know we actually freeze as a first response while brain make a decision. Good video, keep up the good work.

  19. Thank you so much! Your video was engaging and extremely helpful! I have a better understanding of the Fight or Flight Response!

  20. Hi. I want to ask you some questions, because some things are not very clear. So you talk about the fight and flight response, but you say, that the guy getting out of the way of the car doesn't have to do anything with the fight and flight response, it's just the nerves and the muscles. Later on you talk about, how the fight and flight response helped the guy to get out of the way of the car. So I'm a bit confused now, is it or is it not the fight and flight response that helps him? You also talk about adrenaline, and that it's not adrenaline that helps him to get out of the way, because adrenaline couldn't get so fast there. Later on, you talk about how the hypothalamus sends a message to the adrenal medulla which creates adrenaline. So this again it's confusing, because you said it's not adrenaline, what helps the guy. So can you explain these things more clearly please? Thank you!

  21. Please help me,…so a person with POTS (postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome) and gastroparesis is caused because too much epinephrine is being produced? Do you have any thoughts on how to stop this? Doctors don’t appear to know, we have seen enough of them to know that. My 20 year old daughter has POTS,Gastroparesis, MALS and EDS. Only diagnosed within the last year, after 19 years of doctors! I constantly study to try and find information, so if you or anyone can send me input I would appreciate it! Send to:
    [email protected]

  22. Wow! This is unoxidized adrenochrome! This explains why SRA victims are tortured if they are CHOSEN to please the pallet for the day.

  23. Hi. I want to ask you some questions, because some things are not very clear. So you talk about the fight and flight response, but you say, that the guy getting out of the way of the car doesn't have to do anything with the fight and flight response, it's just the nerves and the muscles. Later on you talk about, how the fight and flight response helped the guy to get out of the way of the car. So I'm a bit confused now, is it or is it not the fight and flight response that helps him? You also talk about adrenaline, and that it's not adrenaline that helps him to get out of the way, because adrenaline couldn't get so fast there. Later on, you talk about how the hypothalamus sends a message to the adrenal medulla which creates adrenaline. So this again it's confusing, because you said it's not adrenaline, what helps the guy. So can you explain these things more clearly please? Thank you!

  24. Im a beatboxer, this happened to me on stage! I was very nervous, my saliva stopped generating, it was so weird! Very interesting video dude!

  25. I had this happen to me but I froze instead of running, I was crossing the road and just stopped and I saw a black thing pass super fast in front of me, it was a car going like 90kmh in a city. Thank God I didn't get hit

  26. a kinda funny thing it does is it makes you think you are going to faint but actully fainting in a drop of blood pressure and this is a boost to blood pressure tricking u

  27. Can i get a heart attack or died if i get this fight or flight everyday like few times a day since 6 months.
    I don’t have health insirance or money for
    Doctor, i appreciate your help.

  28. Wrong too much science that does not explain at all the fight or flight mechanism it's like you're someone else it is in control not you and you're either fight or your flight I'm fight if you don't believe me walk up behind me and say Boo and you'll find out how .Fight I have that mechanism and there's nothing I can ever do about it. Explain that

  29. Excellent! WOW, I never knew epinephrine was so important. I now understand why they say stress is a cause of a big gut!!

  30. Does the flight or fight response effect the way you feel things, when it happens to me i feel numb it feels like everything isnt real. That i have to hold someones hand so i can feel them but when i hold their hand it feels different to when i dont feel the flight or fight response

  31. There's also freeze. When I'm scared I freeze a lot. It also happens when I'm having a panic attack. I go almost catatonic and can't move for a few minutes. For some reason my brain can't handle too much stress and it just shuts down and decides to do nothing. Not very good if you're about to be ran over by a car.

  32. Like I legit gone through that experience when my adrenal gland let out chemical, like my back hardened my heart was beating faster and pupils dilated and I had this mindset that I couldn’t think of anything but my mind was set, it was crazy and my penis was shrinking I though I was gonna loose it my balls were shriveling up too, crazy.

  33. I have a traumatic brain injury n it affected my fight or flight part of my brain 🧠 with out benzodiazepines I’m a nut case !!!!😪😪😪🙄used to be a surgical nurse

  34. So, the guy that was about to get hit by the car…
    His brain was pretty much telling his body
    "Fucking move, now!"

  35. I remember my friend froze when a car was about to hit us and I screamed at him and I literally saw him snap back and slam on the gas. Lol I’ve had my fair share of Flight or Fight moments.

  36. Fight or Flight: Why it is NOT the cause of everyday stress

    It is a fact that our voluntarily and involuntary muscles are driven by our emotions, particularly when we are afraid or fearful. This ‘flight or fight’ response, or as it is known today as ‘flight fight freezing system’, or FFFS makes your heart race, your internal organs shut down, and primes your muscles to act to defend yourself, or else run for the hills. On the other hand, the simple tensions that occur when we find it hard to make up our minds activate the postural musculature alone, a simple response that shares little in common with the complex neurological and muscular reactions which comprise fear. In other words, see a spider far away and our postural muscles will move because we think, but see a spider on your nose, and all your muscles and a whole lot more will move because we fear. Do these separate instances correspond to the same neurological causes? Of course not. In both cases, you are avoiding the spider, and yet in each case your physiological responses are distinctively different not only in degree but also in kind.

    Moreover, in the former case your behavior is driven because you think, and in the latter, it is because you are in fear. The former is due to cortical processes, and the latter is due to more primitive neural processes, centered in the midbrain, that govern the emotion of fear. This is a very simple distinction, verified conceptually as well as empirically (see appendix of linked book below for academic sources), but it has not been explained well or has even been entertained in the copious academic and popular estimate of stress. So, our daily stresses and anxieties are distinctive from our fears. They are indeed separate emotions.

    It is a remarkable fact that we’ve got stress figured out all wrong. Our hard-wired fear responses are responses to threat, not choice, and are governed by different neurological processes from those cortically based processes that underscore anxiety or tension. Secondly, neuromuscular tension due to choice conflict only activates the postural musculature, and the global changes in physiological activity, from a racing heart, hormonal changes, to enhanced alertness, vasodilation, hyperventilation, etc. simply are not characteristic of tension elicited by conflicted thought. Both muscular tension and relaxation are ultimately functions of the relationship rather than content of our choices.

    from ‘The Book of Rest’, free at doctormezmer.com

  37. Wow. Can't believe it has that many likes. About 36 corticoids are parasignalled throughout the body releasing cascades from the endocrinological system of which one is cortisol. To make your muscles tighter, take glucose out of your cells, which results in a cognitive appraisal, in which you fight, flight and freeze all the time. We are not trees.

  38. I wanted to add that recent research suggests that the fight or flight response is actually also triggered by something released from the bones. Since even animals with no glands to even produce adrenaline get a fight or flight response.

  39. me my wife and child were in a terrifying earth quake within an instant i put my self preservation above everything and ran off leaving my family in what could of been a tragic situation. it took me ages to come to terms with what i had done. the reason for sharing this is after much searching for answers to avoid this happening it is a good idea to run these scenarios of what should i do through your mind so it prepares you for a better outcome should you find yourself in a similar position again.

  40. I have a wierd problem some reason I can never get any flight or fight /adrenaline or any adrenaline rush. also I don't have any feeling of emotion such as anger or and scared feeling I have had my cortisol and thyroid checked at came back fine im really confused my doctor isn't really helping has anyone else had this kind of problem or feeling with the adrenaline system.

  41. Thank you for this great video. Wish you had gone a little further and discussed the action of the spleen and it's complicating actions.

  42. Damned interesting. What happens to the brain at this point. Does that start to prioritise only certain areas?

  43. This is actually really interesting when it really kicks in.

    I was once chilling agaisnt wall and using my phone.

    All sudden a really big guy hits me with his bike and he almost falls.

    He starts cursing mumbled and says something like "Fucking idiot mfmfmfmf"

    I rolled my eyes and yelled after him "Yeah yeah, but next time learn to drive on correct side of the road"

    Damn he got up from his bike and started approaching me yelling how "Brats like me deserve to get their nose broken"

    I have never felt my body so light and my head so clear in my life. I took weird defensive posture without thinking and prepared to get in fight.

    Then some random woman got between us and told the big guy to fuck off.

    He left mumbling how he hopes to not see me ever again.

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