NIAID Soundbites: Novel Coronavirus Vaccine Research
08
February

By Adem Lewis / in , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , /


What we know is that this virus is in
the same family of viruses like SARS, so it is a kin and about 80% genetically
similar to the SARS virus. We know now based on some of the transmission data
from China that not only did the virus jump from an animal reservoir into
humans, but there is sustained human-to-human transmission. And that’s been documented several times over now, including in a hospital setting with
health care workers. Every day, we’re learning more and more and more. Obviously because this is a novel virus, and even though we’ve been to this rodeo
before with MERS and SARS, there’s still so many unknowns. This is the protein that is on the
surface of a coronavirus, and it is the protein that the virus uses to attach to
the cell and then enter the cell. What a mRNA vaccine is — is we’re
essentially delivering the genetic material. So we’re delivering the
messenger RNA that encodes our mutated novel coronavirus spike. The messenger
RNA will tell the body to present this spike protein, and the body will respond
by creating an immune response. And hypothetically, if all goes well, then
that immune response will then be able to see a novel coronavirus before a
person gets infected and prevent that infection. We started this collaboration with
Moderna because we wanted to utilize our antigen concept, so our vaccine concept, but deliver it via their platform. So what that means is that we take our
sequence from the VRC and we give it to Moderna, and Moderna develops the vaccine. And all of these things are things that
we’ve done very… a lot actually, with MERS and SARS vaccine concepts, including MERS mRNA. So we know what types of immune responses we’re looking for in small
animal models. And so we will be testing, evaluating those immune responses,
and then we will be establishing a clinical trial. It would be upwards of a year before
we have data from those types of studies that would support a vaccine that is
licensed for general use.


11 thoughts on “NIAID Soundbites: Novel Coronavirus Vaccine Research

  1. you have to be seronegative to get a vaccine otherwise if you are infected already with nCoV then it will only get worse. The virus is itself the vaccine.
    So before getting a vaccine, one must be check if negative or positive of the virus. Infected people need an antidote so it's really a race on both, a vaccine and an antidote.

  2. world needs you guys.. All the best.. do your best to create vaccine for this deadly virus. from china now it entered our country INDIA. 3 Confirm cases are detected at airports and they all go to isolation treatment.

  3. Nicely presented in language people with a basic grasp of infectious disease and vaccine development can understand. Two things that were stated but need to be amplified is the time frame to a licensed vaccine of at least a year and while mRNA is promising, to my knowledge, no vaccine has yet been licensed using that technology. One of they key steps that will determine to time to license of the vaccine is whether a surrogate biomarker for protection will be identified that will allow the vaccine to be licensed on immunologic grounds ( like the yearly flu vaccine) or be left with the need to do an efficacy study which would take substantially longer.

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